Entries tagged with “Paris”.


Introducing  Brandon Marino (Agamemnon, Paris)! Troilus and Cressida is Brandon’s first production with PCSC, so he’s answering round one of our Acting Questions.

1) How do you typically go about preparing a Shakespearean character?

How do I go about preparing a Shakespearean Character? Well everyone has their own way, but what works for me is looking at it like a regular character, When I was younger I used to think everyone was refined or goofy and those were the only Shakespearean characters. But now I realize that is not the case, they are people that act a certain way because of something, and the something is usually your choice as an actor, the only difference between doing a character for a modern piece and doing a character for a Shakespeare piece, to me, is the language. The trick with any character is to know your history for the time, to not focus exactly on what you say but how you say it or the subtext of what you’re saying.

2) What do you find to be the most helpful part of PCSC’s standard rehearsal process?

What I find extremely helpful about the Pigeon Creek company is the people involved with it and the people who run it, From what I’ve seen a lot of them are teachers or people in teaching or mentoring positions. This means that when you need help you always have it, and it means that people bring forth a lot of knowledge to the table that someone might previously not have known. It also means everyone has a good work ethic and attitude and that rubs off on people. Also, everyone is a theater nerd, and that’s great because that means everyone is passionate and wants to help you be that way as well. Most of all though, everyone is welcoming and it feels very much like a family, which is a great work environment.

3) What do you do for fun outside of theatre?

I think people ask actors the question of what they like to do outside of theatre a lot. My answer to that question is unique I like to think. I like science, I was actually a chem major with a pre-med focus before switching to theatre. the reason for the switch was simply because I decided not to be scared of a career that isn’t stable and to follow what I really loved. But because of my love for science, I tend to read a lot of science books in my spare time, also comic books, just to confirm those suspicions of my nerdiness.

4) What do you want to be your day job?

My day job is a student. Currently, however, I am working two jobs, one, at Mcdonalds which is as great as it sounds. And the second is actually me working with a children’s theatre. I think, the ultimate goal of any actor is to make a living acting. My personal goal is to do that, probably with a traveling company either doing children’s shows or Shakespeare. I would do this for a few years, and then I would try to settle down somewhere like New York or LA and truly try to follow that actor dream, but that’s real long term, right now it’s graduation of college and then a travelling company.

5) What theatre plans do you have in the next couple months?

My plans in the theatre for the next few months are limited because of my going back to school, obviously I would audition for the upcoming plays, one of which is The Merry Wives of Windsor, But as of right now, I have no roles after Paris and Agamemnon.

Kilian Thomas G. (Paris) on the Original practices

As an actor, what I really want to achieve is the ability to say that I’ve told a good story. Stories are our pasts relived for us, parables manifested, and lessons to be learned. In ancient times, storytelling kept the records of history and keeps local culture alive. Each civilization had it’s own stories and ways of telling them. I could just volunteer to read story books at the library, but the thrill of being in front of an audience and the prospect of helping them enter into an imagined world is far more appealing. Pigeon Creek has given me the opportunity to do this, and has challenged me by doing it in a way more concurrent with traditional Shakespearean practices.

I have mostly worked with proscenium-style theatres, so when I was introduced to thrust staging, certain aspects didn’t quite jibe with what I had learned in the past. Fundamentals of Original Practices (i.e. foot placement, diagonals, and audience interaction) were mostly a new frontier for me. However, as the rehearsal processes progressed, my comfort level with the space grew steadily. The space in a thrust stage is always dynamic, filled with constant movement or powerful three-sided pictures, a right-in-your-face sense of theatre. Being that close to an audience means that one truly needs to be able make the acting shine from every side of their body. Front side, left profile, right profile and back side. How interesting is it to look at the cape of a man just standing there? Instead, what working with the company taught me was how to find focus, and power with stage placement and eye contact.

There are many more aspects of the rehearsal process that have helped me grow as an actor (and specifically with Shakespeare’s text) such as: learning better techniques for dealing with the lofty language, better combat experience, the difficulties adherent in working with a traveling show, teaching myself valuable lessons about acting and time management, and finding the places in those areas where I can still improve. As story tellers we always want our stories to be told to the best of their ability, and the best of their ability is the best of our ability. I also believe we should always be trying to raise the bar for ourselves, and strive for excellence. I hope you come see the show and that you enjoy our world of Verona. Let us tell you a story.